About your Search

20130318
20130326
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10
an hour. [applause] >> now, our love whered president finish beloved president ronald reagan passed away almost ten years ago. but as many in this audience know, it seems nearly impossible to follow political news without hearing some reference to our 40th president. his memory, his name and, fortunately, his legacy seem to be ubiquitous as our country grapples with the challenges of our time. for many years, probably starting with the day after president reagan left office in 1989, there's been a famous question often asked when this is a particularly vexing problem facing our country. you've likely heard it before. we, the questioners often ask, well, what would reagan do? it's a good question to ask, because while times and technology and many faces have changed since president reagan was in office, some important fundamentals, those that speak to who we are as americans, have not. i believe that our guest today, governor jeb bush, understands this. and it's one of the reasons that after having left office just about six years ago he remains an extremely important national voice in th
for ronald reagan's election when he got to the administration then he became a republican. and in the administration he became embroiled in the contra scandal. the attended brandeis and another east coast mostly white school which didn't help the feelings of alienation. she joined the communist party usa and rose to national prominence when she went head-to-head with governor ronald reagan in california when the border regions fired her from her position ask professor for her membership in the communist party. she was then very soon after. back in the 70's was remarkable she was charged with murder and kidnapping and conspiracy in connection with an attempt to jailbreak in the marlene county courthouse in the northern california. she went underground to avoid capture and she was captured and spent 18 months in prison before her trial which was covered the world over. so i will just feed you one more piece from that. this is when she gets captured. entering the motel in the late afternoon, angela noted in passing a dark suit and men in the lobby. she took down the now famil
but under president ronald reagan's watch it is the first thing people associate with the name. she was free elective accept of course for the relatives of those who died in beirut to it's hard to say how it will affect her legacy that it continues to be associated with her time in office. >> host: thank you for the book and for the interview. >> guest: thank you for having me. was a pleasure. >> got was "after words," booktv signature program which authors of the latest nonfiction books are interviewed by journalists, public policy makers, legislators and others familiar with the material. "after words" airs every weekend on booktv 10 p.m. on saturday, 12 and 9 p.m. on sunday and 12 a.m. on monday. you can also watch "after words" on line. good booktv.org and click on "after words" in the book tv series and topics list on the upper right side of the page. >>> jeffrey frank recounts the personal and working relationship between president dwight eisenhower and vice president richard nixon. mr. frank reports nixon constantly sought eisenhower's approval while eisenhower was unsure of mix and's
on? i said this is she. [laughter] hello? and it was ronald reagan and he said sandra, how about that? first name basis. [laughter] i said yes mr. president, he said i would like to announce your nomination tomorrow for the supreme court, is that okay with you? [laughter] that is quote-unquote what happened. [laughter] and i said yes, mr. president, i think it is. so that's what happened. he had sent three people from the attorney general's office to check on my record for i had served in some capacity in all three branches of the arizona state government in the preceding years and of course, i have left the track record and i think the president had sent people out to uncover the press coverage of anything i was involved with and to look at papers in connection with a record. i guess they had not uncovered anything to looks scary so he decided to do that. i was at home the day they've wanted to come now to talk to me. my husband and i had built a sun-dried adobe house in the phoenix area 1957. that was a challenge you could buy the other kind but in this country today it is very hard
the nra in this period is in favor of verse directions on the 2nd amendment and ronald reagan and -- pushed through their right to restrict to bear arms and made this political power possible. but this really puts the party on the map. the delegation of panthers go to the assembly and protest this legislation. they go armed where the laws passed in newspapers all over the world wrote about the black panther party. this is huey p. newton at the wicker throne. i won't have time to talk in detail about a lot of the pictures. another key piece about the black and the party did, the idea wasn't it came right out of malcolm x. if you compared with malcolm x's 1953 program there is an important difference but there's a lot of development. the idea is that the black panther party were the legitimate representatives of the black community. the community had to govern in our own interest and we will take that honor make that happen. the idea was not just about standing up to the police. it never was from the beginning. the party was very much about creating stewardship and self governan
the system. so as ronald reagan said at that time when they were basically three soviet leaders in a little over three years time, they keep dying on me. [laughter] and that's what i think president obama and future american presidents are going to be dealing with. certainly here in the next four years. they have no ability to agree yet on the son of one of these brothers, because the 36 branches each year that if my son gets it, your son, your whole branch is disenfranchised because we will pass it down in our branch because it is not, it was easy to pass a from brother to brother, but how do you decide if you going to pass it from cousin to cousin, which cousin, when there are hundreds of them? the king tried to get around that by having an allegiance council with one person from every branch of the family that would decide, but when his first crown prince die, that group apparently met and one of the brothers said, i should be the next crown prince, and the king said no, i'm picking another brother. and that wasn't the end of one man one vote within the royal family. they never had the v
when she went head to head with governor ronald reagan in california when the board of regents fired her from her first position as a professor for her membership in the communist party. she was then very soon after, actually, again the concentration of events in these people's lives in the '70s is remarkable. she was charged with murder and kidnapping and conspiracy in connection with an attempted jailbreak in the marin county courthouse in california. she went underground to evade capture, she was captured and spent 18 months in prison before her trial which was covered the world over. so i'll just read you one more piece from that. this is when she gets captured. reentering the motel in the late afternoon, angela noted dark-suited men milling about the lob by. she tamped down the now-familiar feeling of panic that spread through her. she was probably imagining things, angela told herself. the stress of life as a fugitive had taken its toll. at this point every white man in a suit seemed to her like an fbi agent ready to pounce. resolutely, she made her way across the lobby and int
about the relationship between richard nixon and ronald reagan during those years? >> there wasn't much. i mean, nixon didn't have much respect for reagan. he didn't think he was all that bright. i don't think he did much -- i think is putting more involved and other ministry should i had a personal experience with nixon when i lived in "washington post." i was in the outlook section, and this is when the first george bush was president, and we were saying, they're saying maybe he's not quite getting the arrival of yeltsin. i said why do we get richard nixon to write a piece for us. they said he will never utter the "washington post." and by gosh, he wrote of these. it was a pretty good one. i came in and i said we need to work up we called his office the next morning. i can't believe i spoke to. he was up all night working on it, and so we ran it. apparently, i was told it had some influence that brent scowcroft like the peace and gave it to president bush and it was a part of his policy. >> another question over here. >> thank you very much. my name is terry stevenson to either questi
of "ronald reagan: the power of conviction and the success of his presidency," a great book which should be read by every student of the u.s. presidency. of "competitive equity: a better way to organize mutual funds." "privatizing fannie may, freddie mac and the home loan banks," we're still working on that, and "the gap gap." here's our book. i hope you read this whole book, but in case you're intimidated by the thickness of it, please in any case read the closing chapter on the burdens and blunders of the dodd-frank act. it is a succinct, compelling case for the prosecution with dodd-frank in the doc to which the jury of time will surely respond guilty and the judge pronounce sentence, string 'em up. peter will present his book. in about 25 minutes we'll have three discussants, we'll give peter a chance to respond and some discussion among the panel, then we'll open the floor to your questions. and at 1:45, unless we run out of questions sooner, we'll adjourn to a coffee reception. copies of peter's book are available at no cost. should we run out and you don't have one yet, you can si
on second amendment, and, um, ronald reagan and the assembly pushed true this legislation -- through this legislation to restrict the right to bear arms and make this initial strategy of policing the police that had built political power, um, the panthers had used to build political power impossible. but this really, this puts the party on the map. chairman seale and a delegation of panthers go to the assembly and protest this legislation. they go armed. this is before the law is passed. and newspapers all over the country, all over the world all of a sudden know about the black panther party. this is huey newton and the wicker throne. i'm not going to have time to talk in detail about a lot of these picture cans. i want to make a few key points. another key piece of what the black panther party did, if you look at the program and compare it with malcolm x's 1963 program, there's some important differences, but there's a lot of learning and development, right? the idea is that the black panther party said we are the legitimate representatives of the black community. the united states
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10